Early Discharge from the Hospital



If you gave birth in a birth center, you and your baby will usually be discharged within 12 hours after birth. The keys to successful early discharge are comprehensive prenatal education (so you are well prepared to take care of yourself and your newborn); home follow-up (usually by a registered nurse) between 48 and 72 hours after the birth; help at home with meals, laundry, and other chores; and telephone access to a health care provider 24 hours a day.

If you have your baby in a hospital, you'll be offered the opportunity to stay for about two days after the baby is born. Know your options ahead of time. Only you will know what feels right for you. You can make your decision after the baby is born and you have had a chance to discuss with your health care provider whether you are ready for early discharge. Or you can plan on it in advance and see how you feel once you've given birth.

Continue to "Helping Your Other Children Adjust" journey to parenthood

Most recent page update: 9/9/2010


© 2014 National Partnership for Women & Families. All rights reserved.

Founded in 1918, Childbirth Connection has joined forces with and become a core program of the National Partnership for Women & Families. Together, these two women's health powerhouses are transforming maternity care in the United States.
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